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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, October 19, 2008

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(October 18-28) SAMPLING WRITERS The Washington DC Jewish Community Center presents the 2009 Jewish Literary Festival through next Wednesday. The festival celebrates this year's best works by emerging and established writers with panel discussions, readings and talks for lovers of fiction, poetry, history and humor.

(October 20-November 4) HALLOWEEN, ON SCREEN AND STREET The AFI Theatre in Silver Spring plays host to Halloween on Screen, starting tomorrow with An American Werewolf in London followed by a long, blood-curdling lineup of horror flicks and fans. On Saturday, the Silver Spring Zombie Walk takes off from the Quarry House Tavern, ending at the AFI Theater for a screening of Shawn of the Dead. You can join other faux flesh-eaters as they shamble and totter down Georgia Avenue at dusk.

(Indefinitely) WEAPONS OF MASS DISRUPTION Perhaps equally scary is The International Spy Museum's newest gallery, Weapons of Mass Disruption, on display in downtown D.C. This wing focuses on cyber-terrorism and the massive disruptions that the simplest technology can create. The museum also presents CIA Magic: The Official CIA Manual of Trickery and Deception tomorrow night at 6:30, linking magic and intelligence as "kindred arts."

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Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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