MD Senator Hopes to Change Women's Health Insurance Premiums | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

MD Senator Hopes to Change Women's Health Insurance Premiums

Play associated audio

Women pay higher health insurance premiums than men in Maryland, Virginia and DC. And many are denied care for pre-existing conditions only women have. This discrimination was the focus of a congressional hearing on Capitol Hill.

Insurers are allowed to charge men and women different rates based on gender. On average a 25 year-old female pays 45 percent more than a 25 year-old man. And Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski says coverage is skimpy at best. She says health care proposals working their way through Congress would to take away an insurers right to deny care to a woman because she is pregnant or had a c-section. One person testified she couldn't purchase a plan from a private insurer unless she underwent sterilization. Mikulski was furious.

"I found it offensive and morally repugnant and I intend to do something about it," said Mikulski.

Insurance companies say women use more health care services than men. Some also face higher premiums if they have pre-existing conditions.

From Capitol News Connection Sara Sciammacco reports...

NPR

Full Of Complexity And Ambivalence, 'American Sniper' Shows The Cost Of War

The film about a Navy SEAL whose service in Iraq made him a mythic figure has become a cultural lightning rod. But the squabbles are too simple for a low-key movie striking in its lack of stridency.
NPR

Live, From Iceland: It's A Hamburger

They call it "The last McDonald's hamburger in Iceland." Purchased more than five years ago, it has been displayed in the Na­tional Museum of Iceland. Now it has its own webcam.
NPR

Attorney General Nominee Faces Senate Judiciary Committee

Seeking confirmation, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch faced the Senate Judiciary committee on Wednesday.
NPR

Yahoo Plans To Spin Off Remaining Stake In Alibaba

Yahoo has announced it will spin off its 15 percent stake in the Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba. Shareholders had been waiting for that decision. The move needs regulatory approval.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.