: News

Filed Under:

MD Senator Hopes to Change Women's Health Insurance Premiums

Play associated audio

Women pay higher health insurance premiums than men in Maryland, Virginia and DC. And many are denied care for pre-existing conditions only women have. This discrimination was the focus of a congressional hearing on Capitol Hill.

Insurers are allowed to charge men and women different rates based on gender. On average a 25 year-old female pays 45 percent more than a 25 year-old man. And Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski says coverage is skimpy at best. She says health care proposals working their way through Congress would to take away an insurers right to deny care to a woman because she is pregnant or had a c-section. One person testified she couldn't purchase a plan from a private insurer unless she underwent sterilization. Mikulski was furious.

"I found it offensive and morally repugnant and I intend to do something about it," said Mikulski.

Insurance companies say women use more health care services than men. Some also face higher premiums if they have pre-existing conditions.

From Capitol News Connection Sara Sciammacco reports...

NPR

'Dragonfish' Offers A Noir Vision Of An 'American Dream Gone Rancid'

The debut novel by Vu Tran is a crime drama involving a white cop, his Vietnamese-born ex-wife and her new husband, a violent crime boss. Maureen Corrigan calls Dragonfish a "haunting literary novel."
NPR

How New Jersey Tamed The Wild Blueberry For Global Production

In the past 10 years, the global blueberry crop has tripled. Yet the big, round commercial blueberry is a fairly recent innovation. It was created by breeders exactly 100 years ago, in New Jersey.
NPR

Just How Arbitrary Is Fox's 10-Person GOP Debate Cutoff?

The top 10 candidates, as determined by Fox's analysis of polls, will debate Thursday. But even when you average polls together, it's tough to tell the difference between the lower-ranked hopefuls.
NPR

Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if there anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.