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Tensions Between Latinos and D.C. Council High

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Tensions are rising between the D.C. Council and the city's Latino community. Last week, the council rejected Mayor Fenty's pick to lead the department of parks and recreation.

Several Latino leaders are calling on the D.C. council to formally apologize for the treatment of Xiena Hartsock,a native of Chile, during her confirmation hearing. During the meeting, D.C. Council member Marion Barry implied that Hartstock did not understand African-American Culture. Hartstock was also questioned about her immigration status.

At a protest outside city hall Wednesday afternoon, League of United Latin American Citizens director Brent Wilkes says Latinos are often shut out of the political process.

During the protest, Council member Kwame Brown made his way down the steps of the Wilson Building to address the crowd. Brown was one of seven members to vote against Hartstock. He says she violated the law by helping privatize city day care centers.

When he finished, Brown walked over and confronted attorney general Peter Nickles, who last week accused the council in an examiner article of holding a "racist, mysoginist hearing."

Brown told Nickles that he ought to be ashamed of himself. Nickles responded that Harstock was voted down unfairly.

Patrick Madden reports...

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