: News

Filed Under:

Difficult Prosecution Yields A "Hollow Victory"

Play associated audio

Nineteen year old Robert Hannah admits to punching Tony Hunter just over a year ago outside a gay bar on Northwest DC's 14th street. Hunter fell back, hit his head and fell into a coma. He died ten days later. Hannah plead guilty to simple assault and was sentenced to six months in jail. Chris Farris, co-chair of Gays and Lesbians against Violence, sees the attack as a hate crime and the calls the sentence inadequate.

"Some semblance of justice was done, but it's a hollow victory. For a man to receive six months in jail with two months credit for time served for the murder of another human being is unacceptable, under any measure," said Farris.

But Hannah, the attacker, argued that he was provoked, that Hunter groped him. Prosecutors say they couldn't find a reliable witness to dispute that claim.

Complicating matters further, Hunter had been drinking, making it easier for him to lose his balance. As a result, Prosecutors say, they were only able to press charges of simple assault.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...

NPR

A Glimpse Of Listeners' #NPRpoetry — From The Punny To The Profound

It was a simple idea: Would you, our listeners, tweet us poems for National Poetry Month? Your response contained multitudes — haiku, lyrics, even one 8-year-old's ode to her dad's bald spot.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

10 Years After Immigration Protests, What Has Changed?

Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, Fermin Vasquez of the SEIU and Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies discuss the legacy of 10 years of activism for immigration reform.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.