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WASHINGTON (AP) The Archdiocese of Washington says it settled a lawsuit with a man who says he was sexually abused as a teenager by a former priest and a seminarian at a D.C. church. The archdiocese says it settled the case brought by Gamal Awad for $125,000.

WASHINGTON (AP) A 19-year-old man has been sentenced to nearly six months in jail the beating death of a man outside a Washington gay club. Robert Hannah pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault for punching Tony Hunter, who fell backward after he was struck and hit his head. Hunter died after 10 days in a coma.

WASHINGTON (AP) A lawyer for an 89-year-old white supremacist accused of killing a guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum says a report on his client's competency to stand trial will be ready at the end of November. James von Brunn is accused of fatally shooting Stephen T. Johns on June 10th.

WASHINGTON (AP) Grief counselors have been visiting a northeast D.C. middle school after one of its students was killed in a drive-by shooting. Police identified the two people killed in the shooting yesterday afternoon as 15-year-old Davonta Artis and 18-year-old Daquan Tibbs.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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