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Banking Association Says Card Skimming At ATMs Is On The Rise

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Authorities on the eastern shore of Maryland are investigating how thieves accessed 88 personal accounts at a branch of the Bank of America by using something called an ATM card skimmer.
Jonathan Wilson
Authorities on the eastern shore of Maryland are investigating how thieves accessed 88 personal accounts at a branch of the Bank of America by using something called an ATM card skimmer.

Authorities on the eastern shore of Maryland are investigating how thieves accessed 88 personal accounts at a branch of the Bank of America by using something called an ATM card skimmer.

Card skimmers work much the same way that a card reader on an ATM works. The skimmers gather your personal information from the magnetic strip on your card, and they're often accompanied by hidden cameras that watch customers entering their PIN numbers.

Margot Mohsberg with the American Bankers Association says ATM users should look for anything that appears tacked on or out of place. "If you see a machine that looks like something has been attached to it, tell your bank, or simply use a different machine," says Mohsberg.

Though no dedicated database tracks this type of fraud, Mohsberg says it appears to be on the rise, locally and nationally, because the technology it uses is easily obtained on the internet.

The advice she gives to account holders also involves the internet. "The internet is very much your best friend, because you can check your account, everyday if you want," says Mohsberg.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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