"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, October 14, 2008 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, October 14, 2008

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(October 15-24) "ONE IN TEN" AT SHAKESPEARE Reel Affirmations highlights more than 100 films over a 10-day period, starting tomorrow at the Shakespeare Theatre Company's Harman Center for the Arts in downtown D.C. This LGBT film festival is punctuated with live events, from receptions and galas to panel discussions with the filmmakers themselves.

(October 15 & 16) NANO You can help Quest theater create its newest play, Nano, during an interactive development project at Gallaudet University in Northeast D.C. tomorrow and Friday. "Nano" explores issues of nanotechnology as applied to the hearing and the deaf. The award-winning visual theatre company specializes in theater that can be enjoyed by all audiences; the play development sessions are free to the public.

(October 17) AN IRISH LIFE FOR ME A jaunt down Route 50 yields Martin Driscoll's Ireland, an exhibit of paintings at the Trowbridge-Lewis Galleries in Middleburg, Virginia opening with a reception Saturday night at 7 p.m. Driscoll's original works depicting Irish life and tradition bring the rolling green hills of the Celts to the rolling green hills of the Commonwealth.

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For This Puzzle, Watch Your Words

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Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
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Indiana Governor: Lawmakers To 'Clarify' Anti-Gay Law

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App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

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