Virginia Lawmakers Investigate Suspect Drywall In Some Houses | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Lawmakers Investigate Suspect Drywall In Some Houses

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Three members of Congress from Virginia are asking lenders to help homeowners stuck with suspect drywall imported from China.

U.S. Senator Mark Warner, along with Congressmen Bobby Scott and Glenn Nye, made the appeal during a tour of affected homes in Chesapeake and Virginia Beach. They were joined by the chair of the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission, Inez Tenenbaum.

The commission is looking into complaints from homeowners who say the drywall is making them sick and corroding wiring in their homes. The Virginian Pilot newspaper reports at least 150,000 sheets of the Chinese-made drywall were imported by a local construction supplier. That's enough to build more than 300 homes.

Warner says some affected homes can't be lived in but the owners still have to pay the mortgages. He says lawmakers are hoping lenders will give homeowners "some forbearance" on those payments while repairs are made.

Matt McCleskey reports...

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