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Bus Leaves Kindergarten Boy Far From Home

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A five-year-old boy from Alexandria was mistakenly put on a bus at his school last week and dropped off at an unfamiliar stop nearly a mile from home and left alone.
www.flickr.com/sean dreilinger
A five-year-old boy from Alexandria was mistakenly put on a bus at his school last week and dropped off at an unfamiliar stop nearly a mile from home and left alone.

A five-year-old boy from Alexandria was mistakenly put on a bus at his school last week and dropped off at an unfamiliar stop nearly a mile from home and left alone.

Gavin Salinas is a kindergartner at Mount Vernon Community School in Alexandria. He was supposed to attend an after-school program and then be picked up by his mother. Instead, he was found wandering the streets and crying by two older boys who took him to the manager of their apartment complex. The manager called Gavin's school, and the school gave him a number for Gavin's mother. The manager then watched over the boy until his mother came for him.

School officials have apologized and say they have overhauled the dismissal system so similar mistakes don't happen again.

Meymo Lyons reports...

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