Should Speed Camera Money Pay For Tasers? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Should Speed Camera Money Pay For Tasers?

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One community in Maryland's Montgomery County wants to use some of the revenue from its speed cameras to buy Tasers for its police force.

Every time a camera captures the license plate of a speeding car, that translates to money in the coffers of local jurisdictions. But there's some disagreement over where some of that money should go. The Washington Examiner reports Chevy Chase Village Police Chief Roy Gordon wants to spend $30,000 in speed-camera revenue on 12 Tasers, saying they're an important public safety tool. But Montgomery County Council member Phil Andrews tells the paper the money raised by speed cameras should be used for improvements related to traffic safety.

Under the village's plan, most of the money would go to traffic-related projects: $1.2 million towards building a sidewalk on Brookville Road and $4.6 million on street lights.

Matt McCleskey reports...

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