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Montgomery County Confident H1N1 Vaccine in Good Supply

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Montgomery County, Maryland has received its first batch of the H1N1 vaccine, and officials there are confident the supplies will meet the demand.

The Dennis Avenue Health Center in Silver Spring is where stockpiles of vaccines including the H1N1 vaccine are stored for distribution across the County.

"We were very anxious for this to come," said Dr. Ulder Tillman, the county's chief of health services. Tillman thinks there eventually will be enough of the vaccine for everyone. But she says the process of rolling it out first to the most at risk creates the appearance of a "bumpy start."

"This is turning on the tap. It's starting slowly but it's gonna build over time so that there will be plenty of vaccine," said Tillman. "It's just how soon it can get out to everyone."

The clinic now has approximately 2,000 doses of the nasal mist form of the vaccine. Tillman expects more nasal mists and the injectable vaccine next week.

Mana Rabiee reports...

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