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D.C. Students For Democratic Society Protest 8-year Afghan Conflict

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In the 60's, the Students for a Democratic Society -- or SDS--helped build anti-war sentiment against the Vietnam conflict. Now, another group with the same name hopes to generate similar results for the Afghan conflict. As the the D.C. Students for a Democratic society marched up 15th street to Thomas circle. It was a smaller crowd than had attended the massive demonstrations spawned by their counterpart 40-years ago. Approximately 75 to 100 students, all railing against the 8-year long conflict in Afghanistan. Students like Paul Donelyn: "We've all had enough of the capitalist war machine and we're here to represent with dancing and peace and love."

Sixty-two year old Don Muller remembers the 60's and the old SDS. He says it's vital these young people speak out. "There was a demonstration Monday in front of the White house and it was people like me so the more these young people fight for justice the better."

The students say they'll do just that with another demonstration at the end of October.

Elliott Francis reports...

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