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Virginia Gubernatorial Candidates Court Business Community

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Democrat Creigh Deeds and Republican Bob McDonnell took turns before a conference room full of business leaders in Leesburg, Virginia.

The gubernatorial candidates each gave their best pro-business pitch, with McDonnell emphasizing regulation. "We need to do more to create more entrepreneurship, 48-hour turn around time on permits, one stop permitting--government needs to be an ally, not an impediment to small business development," said McDonnell.

Deeds says he does not view regulation as a major threat to Virginia business. "We need to jump start our economy and create jobs," said Deeds. "There's probably no quicker way to unlock the potential for economic growth in Virginia than to break the legislative, partisan log jam and pass a plan to fund transportation."

Transportation was a top priority for both candidates, but they disagree sharply on how to fund it. Deeds says he would not use general funds, the bulk of which goes to education, but would consider new taxes if the legislature agreed. McDonell says he'd refuse new taxes, but would consider using general fund money.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...


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