D.C. Group Protests Afghan War | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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    D.C. Group Protests Afghan War

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    As the U.S. marks the 8th anniversary of the conflict in Afghanistan, demonstrators voiced opposition in northwest D.C. with an event that sounded more like a party than protest.

    They called it a roving anti-war dance party. The music was not intended to entertain, but rather to draw attention to a war, which many here feel has gone on too long. The participants in the protest are the D.C. Students For A Democratic Society, 75 to 100 students named after the organization which gained notoriety back in the 60's for massive student led protests which help generate anti-war sentiment against the Johnson and Nixon administrations.

    Although today's crowd in Thomas circle was much smaller, SDS member Rachel Harlick says they share common ground. "One of the things that we do have in common is that we are a student led organization that has a war focus and a student power focus," says Harlick.

    The group plans to have another demonstration at the end of October.

    Elliott Francis reports...

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