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    D.C. Group Protests Afghan War

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    As the U.S. marks the 8th anniversary of the conflict in Afghanistan, demonstrators voiced opposition in northwest D.C. with an event that sounded more like a party than protest.

    They called it a roving anti-war dance party. The music was not intended to entertain, but rather to draw attention to a war, which many here feel has gone on too long. The participants in the protest are the D.C. Students For A Democratic Society, 75 to 100 students named after the organization which gained notoriety back in the 60's for massive student led protests which help generate anti-war sentiment against the Johnson and Nixon administrations.

    Although today's crowd in Thomas circle was much smaller, SDS member Rachel Harlick says they share common ground. "One of the things that we do have in common is that we are a student led organization that has a war focus and a student power focus," says Harlick.

    The group plans to have another demonstration at the end of October.

    Elliott Francis reports...

    NPR

    Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

    The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
    NPR

    Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

    Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.
    WAMU 88.5

    Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

    Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

    WAMU 88.5

    Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

    In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

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