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U.S. Senate Passes Cell-Phone Jamming Bill For State Prisons

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Lawmakers from Maryland say a bill making its way through Congress will help keep corrections officers and civilians safer.

The bill passed the Senate with unanimous consent, allowing states to get federal permission to jam signals from cell phones smuggled into prisons. Governor Martin O'Malley collaborated with Senator Barbara Mikulski on the legislation.

The issue has been a focus in Maryland since a drug dealer in Baltimore used a cell phone to plan the killing of a witness from a city jail two years ago.

O'Malley says the technology is another tool for law enforcement to keep Marylanders safe. Mikulski says she is hopeful the House of Representatives will move quickly on the proposal as well.

Rebecca Blatt reports...

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