D.C. Vote Advocates Converge On Capitol Hill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Vote Advocates Converge On Capitol Hill

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When Congress eventually turns its attention back to the D.C. Voting Rights Act, House lawmakers will have a gun amendment to contend with. Dozens of District residents converged on Capitol Hill Monday for an "I am D.C." Advocacy Day.

D.C. Vote organizers are up against a wall of indifference, but they're not giving up. On this day, advocates donned matching t-shirts and delivered bundles of postcards written by D.C. residents. They targeted Democrats who previously voted in favor of the amendment that would weaken D.C. gun laws.

"People from Arkansas aren't really aware of this issue," says Dixey Bosley-Smith has become the face of voting rights, with her picture plastered on D.C. buses.

"People from Northern Virginia aren't aware of this issue, my God, right across the river," says Bosley-Smith. "People do not know that we don't have voting rights."

D.C. Vote advocates saw congressional staffers. On a Monday, most members are still in their districts and many are focused on health care.

Manuel Quinoes reports...

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