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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 6, 2008

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(October 8 & 9) THE PLAYGROUND A coalition of choreography comes together at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, Thursday and Friday nights at 8 p.m. Hyattsville-based choreographer Daniel Burkholder presents an evening of improvised acrobatics and movement in My Ocean is Never Blue. This ever-changing dance incorporates African and Indian traditions, as four different companies explore water and our relationship to it.

(October 8) BIG BANG You may not have known it's World Space Week, but the folks at the Goddard Space Flight Center did - they present From the Big Bang to the James Webb Telescope, a lecture Thursday night at the Koshland Science Museum in downtown D.C. at 6:30. Astrophysicist John Mather explores the origin of the universe and discusses NASA's plans for its newest telescope to star-struck students and adults.

(October 8) HOLLYWOOD: THE EPICS The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra rolls out "Hollywood: The Epics" Thursday night at The Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda and Friday through Sunday in Baltimore. The BSO SuperPops kick off the new season with soundtracks from Hollywood, including scores from Lawrence of Arabia to Star Trek and Gone with the Wind.

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These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
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The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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