: News

Filed Under:

First Shipments Of H1N1 Vaccine To Arrive In Area Tuesday

Play associated audio
Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine.
James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine.

The first shipments of the H1N1 swine flu vaccine will be arriving in the area as early as Tuesday.

Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine. The first vaccinations will be offered mainly to health care workers.

Maryland expects nearly a million doses to arrive this month, enough to immunize a third or less of the priority population of about 2.9 million. The vaccines are being distributed based on state's populations.

Children under 10 will need two doses of the vaccine to be fully protected, with 21 days between doses.

The Washington Post reports some public school students in the district could get in-school vaccinations as early as October 19th.

Natalie Neumann reports...

NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.