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First Shipments Of H1N1 Vaccine To Arrive In Area Tuesday

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Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine.
James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine.

The first shipments of the H1N1 swine flu vaccine will be arriving in the area as early as Tuesday.

Maryland is slated to receive a first batch of approximately 32,000 doses, while Virginia will receive close to 44,000 doses of the nasal-mist vaccine. The first vaccinations will be offered mainly to health care workers.

Maryland expects nearly a million doses to arrive this month, enough to immunize a third or less of the priority population of about 2.9 million. The vaccines are being distributed based on state's populations.

Children under 10 will need two doses of the vaccine to be fully protected, with 21 days between doses.

The Washington Post reports some public school students in the district could get in-school vaccinations as early as October 19th.

Natalie Neumann reports...

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