Virginia Man Sentenced For Posting Threats | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Man Sentenced For Posting Threats

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A man from southwest Virginia has been sentenced for posting threats of violence at schools online.

Allen Leon Sammons pleaded guilty in June to five counts of transmitting a threat across state lines. The 28-year-old from Oakton posted long essays on livejournal.com expressing his frustrations with the university system. One e-mail sent to Rice University called the school "classist and elitist," adding, that was why Seung-Hui Cho "shot up VTech.

In another post, Sammons stated that he intended to take over a university by force in order to make his point. At times, he stated he bought a cheap, imitation AK-47, which he would use. He also wrote that he intended to commit suicide by cop while in the process of taking over the campus. During a search of Sammons' hard drive, FBI agents found a document labeled "People to Kill." It was a list of names and addresses. He was sentenced to four years in federal prison.

Meymo Lyons reports...

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