Virginia Man Sentenced For Posting Threats | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Virginia Man Sentenced For Posting Threats

Play associated audio

A man from southwest Virginia has been sentenced for posting threats of violence at schools online.

Allen Leon Sammons pleaded guilty in June to five counts of transmitting a threat across state lines. The 28-year-old from Oakton posted long essays on livejournal.com expressing his frustrations with the university system. One e-mail sent to Rice University called the school "classist and elitist," adding, that was why Seung-Hui Cho "shot up VTech.

In another post, Sammons stated that he intended to take over a university by force in order to make his point. At times, he stated he bought a cheap, imitation AK-47, which he would use. He also wrote that he intended to commit suicide by cop while in the process of taking over the campus. During a search of Sammons' hard drive, FBI agents found a document labeled "People to Kill." It was a list of names and addresses. He was sentenced to four years in federal prison.

Meymo Lyons reports...

NPR

No Demons, No Angels: Attica Locke Aims For Black Characters Who Are Human

In her new novel, Pleasantville, and on TV's Empire, Locke does her best to avoid simple stories. "You do some good stuff and you do some bad stuff," she says. "... We exist in the middle."
NPR

When Danish Cows See Fresh Spring Pasture, They Jump For Joy

Thousands of spectators gather every April to see ecstatic cows return to fields on organic farms around Denmark. The organic industry says the event has helped fuel demand for organic foods.
NPR

Proposed Retirement Advice Rule Has Worrisome Loopholes, Experts Say

The Department of Labor has crafted a proposed rule to better protect Americans saving for retirement. But questions are already being raised about how effective the new rule will be.
NPR

Solar Power Makes Electricity More Accessible On Navajo Reservation

The panels, funded by government grants, are helping thousands of tribal residents take advantage of the everyday luxuries enjoyed by other Americans — like turning on lights or storing food.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.