: News

Filed Under:

Metro Steps Up Cleaning And Communication Efforts For Flu Season

Play associated audio

It could be a flu season to remember, and Metro says it's taking extra steps to keep its buses, trains and stations clean, and its passengers healthy.

Instead of bi-weekly cleanings, Metro workers will wipe down the inside of trains and buses once-a-week through flu season.

"We can't protect people completely, but we're trying to make an effort for both our riders and our employees," says Joan LeLacheur, Metro's deputy chief of environmental management.

Some riders say they're not worried about using public transportation during flu season. Bobbie Fleet says she does wish the more frequent cleanings become a year-round practice.

"I think it's good they're cleaning things more often, not even just because it's flu season," says Fleet. "I just think all public places should be better taken care of."

Brand new for this flu season are red and white posters in vehicles and stations, reminding riders to sneeze and cough into their sleeves, wash their hands, and stay off public transportation if they are sick.

The posters are in both English and Spanish, and riders should start seeing them this week.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

A conversation with Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner.

NPR

Frozen Food Fears: 4 Things To Know About The Listeria Recall

The FDA issued a massive recall of frozen fruits and vegetables this week. Here's what you need to know about the nasty bug that's causing all the problems.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.