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Metro Steps Up Cleaning And Communication Efforts For Flu Season

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It could be a flu season to remember, and Metro says it's taking extra steps to keep its buses, trains and stations clean, and its passengers healthy.

Instead of bi-weekly cleanings, Metro workers will wipe down the inside of trains and buses once-a-week through flu season.

"We can't protect people completely, but we're trying to make an effort for both our riders and our employees," says Joan LeLacheur, Metro's deputy chief of environmental management.

Some riders say they're not worried about using public transportation during flu season. Bobbie Fleet says she does wish the more frequent cleanings become a year-round practice.

"I think it's good they're cleaning things more often, not even just because it's flu season," says Fleet. "I just think all public places should be better taken care of."

Brand new for this flu season are red and white posters in vehicles and stations, reminding riders to sneeze and cough into their sleeves, wash their hands, and stay off public transportation if they are sick.

The posters are in both English and Spanish, and riders should start seeing them this week.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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