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Senators Question District Voucher Program

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Senators are questioning why federal money is being spent on private schools in the District that aren't accredited. The federal voucher program helps seventeen hundred low-income D.C. kids afford private and religious schools.

Senator Susan Collins of Maine worries there's not enough oversight of some private schools which are not accredited. "The Catholic schools are all accredited, the charter schools are either accredited or in the process of being accredited."

At a Capitol Hill hearing Tuesday, Collins proposed making it a requirement. She asked voucher fund director Gregory Cork if he would support the change. "I think that process is worth considering, so yes, I would answer your question but I would say I would want some things put in place to make it a fair process."

First, however, Congress has to reauthorize the program, which expires next year. Ensuring accreditation could be a big step toward getting Congressional support.

Tanya Snyder reports...

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