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Local Businesses Face Different Challenges When it Comes to H1N1

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Local employers are trying to figure out how to cope with what could be a really tough flu season.
C. S. Goldsmith and A. Balish, CDC
Local employers are trying to figure out how to cope with what could be a really tough flu season.

Local employers are trying to figure out how to cope with what could be a really tough flu season, because of the H1N1 virus. Health officials encourage employers to let more people work from home to contain the spread of the H1n1 virus. For public policy research firms and there are many in the D.C. area that's not a big problem.

Susan Markey, human resources manager for the firm Mathematica, says much of the work CAN be done from home computers. "I don't think productivity will be down that much if we were to have people stay at home," she says.

For others attending the Greater Washington Board of Trades policy forum on the swine flu preparing for H1N1 isn't as simple. Gary Aller works at Gallaudet University. He says the school already has taken efforts to improve campus hygiene, and to allow students feeling sick to receive meals in their dorms.

Aller says all organizations need to recognize the dangers of the vrius and have a plan to deal with it. "I would say pick one employee to be the flu executive or flu champion," Aller says.

Vaccinations for H1N1 become available starting next week.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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