D.C. Teens Sharpen Driving Skills on Test Track | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Teens Sharpen Driving Skills on Test Track

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As federal and state governments get increasingly tough on drivers who text and use cell phones behind the wheel, dozens of area teens got a good lesson in the dangers during a morning at RFK stadium. One teen, 16-year old Angelique Pain is driving a compact car through a series of complex obstacles. She's one of approximately 2-dozen D.C. students chosen to participate in a driver training program sponsored by Ford.

With the help of an instructor, Angelique is getting a good look at what can happen to an inexperienced driver, distracted by sudden road changes, passengers, or cell phone use and texting. "I'll drive slow now and not pay attention to the radio like I was trying to."

Jim Graham is manager of the program. "There'll always be distractions but the key is to try and limit them. We're trying to focus on that today so hopefully we can eliminate some of those distractions."

According to research results released by Ford, teen drivers are 4-times more likely to be distracted by cell phone use than an adult.

Elliott Francis reports...

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