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Local Food Bank Anticipates Record Numbers For Second Straight Holiday Season

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Local food banks are preparing for another busy holiday season and hoping the local community will continue to respond to the steady stream of hungry families.

The waiting room is full at the Arlington Food Assistance Center, or AFAC. One regular client, a 77-year-old who didn't want to give her name, says though she's hopeful an economic recovery is on the way, there are no signs of it here.

"No, I don't see it. I think it will get better; this holiday season people are still going to be suffering a little," she says.

AFAC's Executive Director Christine Lucas says she hopes local donors don't assume the worst is over for needy families.

"I just can only hope that the community will respond, that they won't say, 'We helped AFAC last year, we can't help them this year,'" Lucas says. "We will definitely need their help this year."

The Capital Area Food Bank, which distributes food to 700 local agencies including AFAC, doled out more than 23 million pounds of food last year, its most ever. That number is expected to rise again this year.

Jonathan Wilson reports...


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