D.C. Council Seeks To Ban Sale Of Individual Cigars At Some Stores | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Council Seeks To Ban Sale Of Individual Cigars At Some Stores

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The D.C. Council seeks to ban gas stations and convenience stores from selling individual cigars.
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The D.C. Council seeks to ban gas stations and convenience stores from selling individual cigars.

The D.C. Council is seeking to ban gas stations and convenience stores from selling individual cigars.

They're known as "blunts:" individually wrapped cigars that often come in flavors such as grape, apple or peach, and can cost less than $1. And according to the bill's sponsor Councilwoman Yvette Alexander, it's no secret what they're used for. "These individual cigars are being purchased for the sole purpose of smoking marijuana and PCP," says Alexander.

Alexander says legislation, which would not apply to tobacco shops or cigar bars, will curb marijuana use among young people.

Opponents of the bill include shop keepers who worry the ban will hurt business, and cigar store owners, who say the proposal's wording is too vague.

Patrick Madden reports...

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