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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, September 29, 2009

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(September 30) CONVERSATION WITH AN ARTIST The Phillips Collection presents Conversations with Artists a free and lively discussion tomorrow at 5:30 at the D.C. gallery. The subject: Conrad Bakker. The medium: everyday objects. Bakker uses humor to highlight conspicuous consumption in modern culture. You can find out more during this informal conversation about his ongoing series Untitled Projects, which includes sculptures replicating the ordinary and mundane.

(September 30) WHAT'S IT ALL MEAN The Smithsonian American Art Museum hosts a free lecture, What's It All Mean in downtown D.C. at 7 p.m. tomorrow. The talk is part of the annual Clarice Smith Distinguished Lectures in American Art series. Click here for more information on Wiley's exhibition, which opens at the museum on Friday.

(September 29) TERRA ANTARCTICA National Geographic in downtown D.C. lets audiences paddle among blue glaciers without getting cold during Terra Antarctica, part of a free film series, today at noon. Audiences can explore Earth's most remote continent at sea level with filmmaker and explorer Jon Bowermaster, as he captures Antarctica's rare, naturally beautiful images on film.

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