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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, September 29, 2009

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(September 30) CONVERSATION WITH AN ARTIST The Phillips Collection presents Conversations with Artists a free and lively discussion tomorrow at 5:30 at the D.C. gallery. The subject: Conrad Bakker. The medium: everyday objects. Bakker uses humor to highlight conspicuous consumption in modern culture. You can find out more during this informal conversation about his ongoing series Untitled Projects, which includes sculptures replicating the ordinary and mundane.

(September 30) WHAT'S IT ALL MEAN The Smithsonian American Art Museum hosts a free lecture, What's It All Mean in downtown D.C. at 7 p.m. tomorrow. The talk is part of the annual Clarice Smith Distinguished Lectures in American Art series. Click here for more information on Wiley's exhibition, which opens at the museum on Friday.

(September 29) TERRA ANTARCTICA National Geographic in downtown D.C. lets audiences paddle among blue glaciers without getting cold during Terra Antarctica, part of a free film series, today at noon. Audiences can explore Earth's most remote continent at sea level with filmmaker and explorer Jon Bowermaster, as he captures Antarctica's rare, naturally beautiful images on film.

NPR

'Game Of Thrones' Evolves On Women In Explosive Sixth Season

The sixth season of HBO's Game of Thrones showed a real evolution in the way the show portrays women and in the season finale, several female characters ascended to power. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Glen Weldon from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour and Greta Johnsen, host of the Nerdette podcast, about the show.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, one of the largest poultry companies in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

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