"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, September 24, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, September 24, 2009

Play associated audio

(Sept 24-Oct 11) OMBAMANOLOGUES Decades down the road, what will you recall about the election of President Barack Obama? That's the question posed by Obamanologues, on stage at the Mead Theatre Lab at Flashpoint in downtown D.C. through October 11th. This political theater production provides an historical account of the 44th President's bid for the White House, through monologues ranging from the rebellious to the scholarly.

(September 24) WPA RETURNS The Phillips Collection hosts the Washington Project for the Arts near Dupont Circle tonight at 6:30. This experimental media series allows artists the space to create innovative sound and video art, showcasing local, international and emerging talent.

(September 24) ARGOS TRIO The Argos Trio arrives at [The Strathmore Music Center] (WHERE? Bethesda?) (http://www.strathmore.org/) tonight at 7:30. Liana, Lars and Linda play violin, cello and piano, applying their musical mastery to a cheeky performance of Piano Trios No. 1 and 2 by Mendelssohn and Shostakovich, respectively.

NPR

In This Test Kitchen, The Secret To A Great Cookbook Is Try, Try Again

Yotam Ottolenghi and his partner have a thriving food empire that includes wildly successful cookbooks. We go inside their London test kitchen as recipes are put through their paces.
NPR

Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe

A U.K. researcher says the environmental argument for eating bugs isn't working on its own. She says chefs and policymakers must "make insect dishes appeal as food, not just a way to save the planet."
NPR

Nebraska Legislators Overturn Governor's Veto Of Death Penalty Repeal

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Nebraska Sen. Jerry Johnson, who said he switched his vote in the decision to repeal the death penalty in Nebraska after speaking with his constituents.
NPR

Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

The scanners are standard equipment for police, but what's not settled is what happens to all the data collected. That data can link people to certain addresses and flag unusual activity.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.