Maryland Officials Propose Stricter Boating Laws | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Maryland Officials Propose Stricter Boating Laws

Play associated audio

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) Maryland officials plan to ask legislators to make boating laws stricter as boating deaths in the state reach a seven-year high.

The Department of Natural Resources is proposing requiring more children to wear life jackets and placing age restrictions on who may supervise an uncertified boater.

Fifteen people have died on Maryland waterways this year despite stepped-up enforcement and high-visibility safety campaigns by Natural Resources Police.

One proposal endorsed by the O'Malley administration, would raise the age threshold for children required to wear a personal flotation device, from 7 to 13.

Another would require that a person with a boater safety certificate supervising someone operating a boat without a certificate be 18 years old. There is no age requirement currently.

Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

WAMU 88.5

'Historic Landmark' Status Complicates Corcoran Renovations

Plans by George Washington University to renovate the Corcoran Gallery of Art may be thrown for a loop after D.C.'s historic preservation board designated much of the interior of the building as a historic landmark.

NPR

In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

The Southern Museum of Food and Beverage in New Orleans chronicles the eats and drinks of the Southern states. And it may be one of the only museums where visitors can imbibe while viewing exhibits.
NPR

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

In the New York Congressional district where an an unarmed black man died at the hands of police last year, neither candidate for a special congressional election is using the death to score points.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.