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Some Commuters Have Already Chosen to Go Car Free

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It may be Car-Free day today, but many commuters have already chosen to go car free over the past few years. Between 2007 and 2008, as gas prices soared, public transit saw a surge, according to a report by Environment America. Across the state of Maryland, ridership on buses and subways increased 15%. In Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia, ridership rose 24%. In the District, where ridership tends to be higher -- the change was more modest - at 3%.

Rebecca Perring is with the Coalition for Smarter Growth, "what this really means is that commuters are saving money." She says there have been environmental consequences to the trend.

"This has saved fuel equal to 450,000 cars in the dc reegion, and 2 and half tons of carbon emissions." It's unclear how the recession is affecting publict transit in 2009. Rob McCulloch, lead author of the report, says recession generally decreases travel activity, but more people use public transportation because of cost. A telling sign is bus ridership in the first half of 2009 compared to a year before. It's up 30% in D-C.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...

NPR

Trump Off Camera: The Man Behind The 'In-Your-Face Provocateur'

Biographer Marc Fisher says Donald Trump has lived a "strikingly solitary life given how public he is." Fisher and his Washington Post colleague Michael Kranish are the authors of Trump Revealed.
NPR

Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

According to interviews conducted before and after Berkeley imposed a tax on sugary drinks, the tax is having the desired effect. People reported drinking 20 percent fewer sugar-sweetened drinks after the tax went into effect.
NPR

FBI To Release Thousands More Documents In Clinton Email Probe

Thousands more emails from Hillary Clinton's time as secretary of state could be released just weeks before the November election.
WAMU 88.5

Why We Open Our Hearts And Wallets For Some Disasters—But Not Others

Flooding in Louisiana has caused tens of millions of dollars in property damage and untold personal misery. But public response has been slow. Join us to talk about why we open our hearts and wallets for some disasters and not others.

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