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Some Commuters Have Already Chosen to Go Car Free

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It may be Car-Free day today, but many commuters have already chosen to go car free over the past few years. Between 2007 and 2008, as gas prices soared, public transit saw a surge, according to a report by Environment America. Across the state of Maryland, ridership on buses and subways increased 15%. In Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia, ridership rose 24%. In the District, where ridership tends to be higher -- the change was more modest - at 3%.

Rebecca Perring is with the Coalition for Smarter Growth, "what this really means is that commuters are saving money." She says there have been environmental consequences to the trend.

"This has saved fuel equal to 450,000 cars in the dc reegion, and 2 and half tons of carbon emissions." It's unclear how the recession is affecting publict transit in 2009. Rob McCulloch, lead author of the report, says recession generally decreases travel activity, but more people use public transportation because of cost. A telling sign is bus ridership in the first half of 2009 compared to a year before. It's up 30% in D-C.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...

NPR

As Shakespeare Turns 450, 'Hamlet' Tour Makes The World A Stage

Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
NPR

Green GOP Group Caught Between 'Rock And A Hard Place'

On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

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