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Scientists in Baltimore for the Global Summit on Stem Cell Research

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Scientists from all over the world in Baltimore for the start of the Global Summit on Stem Cell Research. Josh Basile has a message for stem cell researchers: Hurry up! "I just want it to be faster, so I can get out of this chair as soon as possible."

Basile gets around in an electric wheelchair. He broke his neck five years ago when a rogue wave knocked him over at Bethany Beach in Delaware. Basile says stem cells could create a bridge over the damaged part of his spinal cord. "And somebody like myself that is unable to walk and use my arms, it would change my life. I would be able to regain my independence."

Basile wants to see that happen for others. That's why he started a foundation called Determined-2-Heal. Basil says advocacy has become a calling. The University of Maryland senior plans to start law school next year. But this week he'll be at the stem cell conference in Baltimore, on the lookout for a breakthrough.

Cathy Duchamp reports...

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