Scientists in Baltimore for the Global Summit on Stem Cell Research | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Scientists in Baltimore for the Global Summit on Stem Cell Research

Play associated audio

Scientists from all over the world in Baltimore for the start of the Global Summit on Stem Cell Research. Josh Basile has a message for stem cell researchers: Hurry up! "I just want it to be faster, so I can get out of this chair as soon as possible."

Basile gets around in an electric wheelchair. He broke his neck five years ago when a rogue wave knocked him over at Bethany Beach in Delaware. Basile says stem cells could create a bridge over the damaged part of his spinal cord. "And somebody like myself that is unable to walk and use my arms, it would change my life. I would be able to regain my independence."

Basile wants to see that happen for others. That's why he started a foundation called Determined-2-Heal. Basil says advocacy has become a calling. The University of Maryland senior plans to start law school next year. But this week he'll be at the stem cell conference in Baltimore, on the lookout for a breakthrough.

Cathy Duchamp reports...

NPR

Ellar Coltrane Speaks Of Growing Up On Screen In 'Boyhood'

Film director Richard Linklater's latest movie, Boyhood, was shot over 12 years. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks with the star of the film, Ellar Coltrane, who's spent over a decade shooting the movie.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Can $100 Million Buy You — Besides An Election In Kentucky?

Campaign spending on the Kentucky Senate race could reach $100 million. So what can that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Tech Week: Google's World Cup Play, Amazon Sued And Kids Tracked

Also in this week's roundup, a tech company that may not exist, using sensors to keep your plants alive and what the debate over sandwich taxonomy teaches us about innovation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.