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Emergency Training in Virginia To Include Simulated Bombings

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Emergency responders in Northern Virginia are holding training exercises later this month that will include simulated bombings and a truck filled with explosives. Earlier this month, a Coast Guard training exercise on the Potomac River sparked controversy after television news reports initially claimed shots had been fired near ceremonies where the President was acknowledging the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. With the emergency training now scheduled in Virginia, planners are giving plenty of notice.

The regional full-scale exercise is set for next Saturday, September 26 from 7 a.m. to noon. The drills include simulated bombings near train tracks in Crystal City and at a Virginia Railway Express station in Prince William County, and a simulated car chase starting in Loudon County and ending in Fairfax with an overturned truck containing bombs and hazardous chemicals.

Planners say residents should expect to see more public safety vehicles on the roads during the exercises.

Matt McCleskey has the details...

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