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Metro Employees May Learn To Look For Warning Signs Of Suicide Attempts

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Metro Employees may be getting some help in preventing suicide attempts on Metro Tracks.

Mary Azoy is Director of Community Education and Crisis Response for Crisislink, a suicide prevention group. Her organization heads a coalition of organizations working with Metro to address suicide attempts. She says there are warning signs.

"Anyone looking for the trains but not getting on them, watching them come and go," says Azoy, is one sign that someone may be contemplating a suicide attempt. "Someone who appears particularly distraught or who appears zoned out and numb looking."

While the behavior may not be a an indication that a suicide attempt is imminent, Azoy says, its still worth keeping an eye on. The coalition is considering a host of strategies to combat the problem. There have been nine attempts on metro this year, seven of them fatal.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...

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