: News

Filed Under:

Maryland Revenues Fall Short... Again

Play associated audio

Maryland is facing yet another budget shortfall and all options are on the table for the next round of cuts. New revenue estimates show the state will bring in almost 700 million dollars less than expected this fiscal year.

Eloise Foster is Secretary of the Maryland's Department of Budget and Management. She's the one who has to figure out how to balance the budget. She says budget planners feared such a shortfalll -- so they built in a cushion -- but it wasn't enough. "We were expecting there to be some revisions in revenue but the magnitude of the write down is really greater than what was anticipated."

That means the state has to cut 300 million dollars from the fiscal year 2010 budget. That's on top of the three quarters of a billion dollars already cut from this year's budget.

Foster will meet with heads of stage agencies to find new propsals. "We're going to preserve critical state services, we're gonna preserve safety net programs, we're gonna continue to protect our investment in education, and overall we want to support initiatives that will help us stimulate our state economy. But all that said, everything is on the table."

Foster says the economy is bottoming out, and predicts this will be the last round of unexpected cuts.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...

NPR

Book Review: 'Born To Run,' Bruce Springsteen

Music critic Will Hermes reviews a new autobiography from Bruce Springsteen called Born To Run.
WAMU 88.5

A Matter Of Taste: What Prix Fixe Menus Say About D.C.'s Dining Scene

Is a meal for a special occasion worth hundreds of dollars?

NPR

Clinton-Trump Showdown Is Most-Watched Presidential Debate

An estimated 84 million people watched Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in their first debate Monday, according to TV ratings data from Nielsen, making it the most-watched debate ever.
NPR

When Phones Went Mobile: Revisiting NPR's 1983 Story On 'Cellular'

The report titled "Cellular Phones Are Completely Mobile" features a man who was "among the first 1,500 customers to use a new mobile phone system called cellular."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.