Howard University Gets Stimulus Grant To Repair Historic Building | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Howard University Gets Stimulus Grant To Repair Historic Building

Play associated audio

Howard University in Washington D.C. is getting federal economic stimulus money to repair a building that's steeped in the history of African-American desegregation.

Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar, makes his way gingerly around the darkened and crumbling auditorium inside the Minor Teachers College, a three story red brick Neo-Classical structure built in the 1850's.

He's just announced the $800,000 grant as part of a $14 million effort to help refurbish historically black colleges and universities like Howard.

"Our investment today is a down payment on what has to be done here at Howard," says Salazar.

Lesley Fenwick is Dean of the School of Education. She's been guiding Salazar through a tour of the dilapidated sections of the building, flashlight in hand.

"It was the site for preparation of black teachers in Washington D.C. for years, established by a white abolitionist. So the history of the place is very compelling," she says.

Fenwick says the grant aims to restore Howard's most historic building back to its original intent as a center for teaching.

Mana Rabiee reports...

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 1

Music from West Africa and photography from South East Asia come to the D.C. area.

NPR

From Kale To Pale Ale, A Love Of Bitter May Be In Your Genes

Researchers have found a gene that affects how strongly you experience bitter flavors. And those who aren't as sensitive eat about 200 more servings of vegetables per year.
NPR

Obama Sidesteps Midterm Campaigning As Approval Ratings Slump

The president's job approval rating is somewhere in the low 40s. That means there are a lot of places where his presence would hurt more than it helps.
NPR

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

The social networking site will not change its requirement for people to use "real" names on their profiles, but it will adjust how alleged violations are reported and enforced.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.