D.C. Council Weighs Water Changes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Weighs Water Changes

Play associated audio

D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority and D.C.'s Fire and Emergency Medical Services are considering changes after an investigation into the fire that destroyed the home of philanthropist Peggy Cooper Cayfritz in July.

Possible changes include revising the water flow standards required for fighting fires in the district and marking hydrants to make them easier to find.

But in testimony before a city council committee, representatives from D.C. WASA and the district's fire and emergency services said that there are no easy answers to the question of what caused the fire in Northwest Washington's Foxhall neighborhood.

They said that the water pressure in the chain bridge road area meets current standards. Fire Cheif Dennis Rubin said there were other problems,including the distance from house to the hydrant, and the closest water main.

Chief Rubin and interim D.C. WASA director Avis Russell agree the topography challenge in the chain bridge area most likely exists elsewhere in the District. Both say they will examine other neighborhoods, 37 in all with similar issues.

The committee is expected to hold another meeting on the matter but did not set a date.

Elliott Francis reports...

WAMU 88.5

Audiences Get A Modern Look At A 19th Century Opera

Opera as seen through the lens of Google Glass? Wolf Trap is giving audiences the chance to mix technology with Bizet’s classic "Carmen" this month.
NPR

Can You Trust That Organic Label On Imported Food?

A new book claims the organic label can't be trusted, especially on food that's imported. Yet there is a global system for verifying the authenticity of organic food, and it mostly seems to work.
NPR

Democrats Make New Bid To Require Donor Transparency

The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.