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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, September 17, 2009

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The show, from Morris Louis' "Color School" works to the bright lights of Leo Villareal are on display at Conner Contemporary through October 31st.
Morris Louis "Plenitude," 1958
The show, from Morris Louis' "Color School" works to the bright lights of Leo Villareal are on display at Conner Contemporary through October 31st.

(September 17 & 18) THE TRIAL The Actor's Gang travels from L.A. to College Park, to perform The Trial of the Catonsville Nine at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center tonight and tomorrow at 8.

(Sept 17-Nov 15) GO, DOG, GO! Adventure Theatre in Maryland's Glen Echo Park pulls out the milk and cookies for a pajama party performance of Go, Dog, Go! tomorrow night at 7. The show runs through November 8th. This racy story tells the tale of an adventurous yellow dog and a pretty pink poodle, providing plenty of bedtime story fun. There's also a Go, Dog, Go! book club meeting on Saturday, September 26th.

(September 17-October 31) LYRICAL ABSTRACTION Conner Contemporary Art off Florida Avenue Northwest hosts Conversations in Lyrical Abstraction: 1958-2009, opening tomorrow and running through Halloween. The works of Morris Louis, Alma Thomas, Howard Mehring and others drip off the walls in runny layers of color.

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