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Montgomery County Police To Hold Public Meetings

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Police are holding a public meeting this morning about the murder of a woman last week in Silver Spring, Maryland. Simone White, 37, was a citizen of Jamaica. She was shot outside her apartment off of Briggs Cheney Road and Columbia Pike last Wednesday.

White's sister, Keisha Chaplain, traveled from Jamaica to accompany her sister's body to their home. "I'm making a heart-felt appeal to anyone who knows anything relating to this senseless murder to contact the police so that justice can be done," said Chaplain.

Joy Nurmi, Director of services for Montgomery County's Eastern Region, is helping coordinate a meeting for police, residents and business owners in the area. "Because there is a lot of concern in the community regarding this crime, we wanted to make sure that we got a community meeting together so that they can talk to the police, express their concerns to help solve crimes--not just this one, but all crimes."

Authorities say they want to continue the meetings to inform residents of crime and to build ties in the community. The first meeting is scheduled for 9:30 at the Eastern Montgomery Regional Center off Briggs Cheney Road.

Stephanie Kaye reports...

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