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D.C. Hosts First Town Hall Meeting

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One of the first town hall meetings on health care reform following President Obama's address to Congress on the issue generated more questions than shouts.

Approximately 200 people attended after being invited by D.C. Delegate Elenore Holmes-Norton, who listened to residents like this part-time teacher afflicted with Cerebral Palsy. "...I wanna know why I can't pay a co-pay so that I can have the kind of home care service I need."

With the legislative pendulum beginning to swing toward insurance co-ops rather than the so-called public option, She made this prediction about the legislation that will emerge from Congress. "...Let me be completely up front with you. I believe it will fall far short of what deserves to be health care reform...I believe the public option has already been killed in the Senate."

Their evening was absent of the heated exchanges and vitriol that characterized many of the health care town halls held across the country during the past few months. As one staffer put it, only residents of the District were admitted and they were expected to conduct themselves as members of any progressive community would.

Elliott Francis reports...

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