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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 16, 2009

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(September 17) THE ART OF SCIENCE The Koshland Science Museum in downtown D.C. shares some scientific secrets during The Emerging Science of Climate Change tomorrow night at 6:30. Scientists from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/) attempt to predict the earth's temperature and changing landscape over the next two centuries--an artful science.

(Through Nov 20) THE ART OF TRANSFORMATION The Embassy of Japan illuminates its industrial revolution in The Art of Transformation, an exhibit of prints on display through November 20th. Japan's self-imposed isolation came to an end in 1909, when the first delegation of Japanese businessmen arrived in the U.S. The embassy celebrates the centennial of this historic exchange with an exhibit of colorful woodblock reprints revealing the foundations of Japan's modern infrastructure and urbanization.

(September 17) THE ART OF AIRMEN The United States Air Force Band Airmen of Note performs at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Take 5 Jazz Concert tomorrow night starting at 5 pm. With a fifty-year tradition of modern big band jazz, the Airmen soar both in the air and on stage.


Nonprofit Roundabout Is A Regional Theater Right On Broadway

For 50 years the Roundabout has survived by presenting revivals of plays and musicals that other theaters won't. Though rates are meager, it still manages to attract major stars for its productions.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

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