"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 16, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 16, 2009

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(September 17) THE ART OF SCIENCE The Koshland Science Museum in downtown D.C. shares some scientific secrets during The Emerging Science of Climate Change tomorrow night at 6:30. Scientists from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/) attempt to predict the earth's temperature and changing landscape over the next two centuries--an artful science.

(Through Nov 20) THE ART OF TRANSFORMATION The Embassy of Japan illuminates its industrial revolution in The Art of Transformation, an exhibit of prints on display through November 20th. Japan's self-imposed isolation came to an end in 1909, when the first delegation of Japanese businessmen arrived in the U.S. The embassy celebrates the centennial of this historic exchange with an exhibit of colorful woodblock reprints revealing the foundations of Japan's modern infrastructure and urbanization.

(September 17) THE ART OF AIRMEN The United States Air Force Band Airmen of Note performs at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Take 5 Jazz Concert tomorrow night starting at 5 pm. With a fifty-year tradition of modern big band jazz, the Airmen soar both in the air and on stage.

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Nebraska Lawmakers Override Veto; Abolish Death Penalty

Nebraska's governor had tried to veto a bill repealing the death penalty but the one-house legislature overrode the veto. Nebraska has executed only three prisoners since the 1950s, the last in 1997.
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The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

The debate over whether digital books are better continues. But in the age of Amazon, the number of independent booksellers is up. The revival is fueled, at least in part, by digital natives.

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