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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 16, 2009

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(September 17) THE ART OF SCIENCE The Koshland Science Museum in downtown D.C. shares some scientific secrets during The Emerging Science of Climate Change tomorrow night at 6:30. Scientists from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/) attempt to predict the earth's temperature and changing landscape over the next two centuries--an artful science.

(Through Nov 20) THE ART OF TRANSFORMATION The Embassy of Japan illuminates its industrial revolution in The Art of Transformation, an exhibit of prints on display through November 20th. Japan's self-imposed isolation came to an end in 1909, when the first delegation of Japanese businessmen arrived in the U.S. The embassy celebrates the centennial of this historic exchange with an exhibit of colorful woodblock reprints revealing the foundations of Japan's modern infrastructure and urbanization.

(September 17) THE ART OF AIRMEN The United States Air Force Band Airmen of Note performs at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Take 5 Jazz Concert tomorrow night starting at 5 pm. With a fifty-year tradition of modern big band jazz, the Airmen soar both in the air and on stage.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

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