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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 16, 2009

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(September 17) THE ART OF SCIENCE The Koshland Science Museum in downtown D.C. shares some scientific secrets during The Emerging Science of Climate Change tomorrow night at 6:30. Scientists from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/) attempt to predict the earth's temperature and changing landscape over the next two centuries--an artful science.

(Through Nov 20) THE ART OF TRANSFORMATION The Embassy of Japan illuminates its industrial revolution in The Art of Transformation, an exhibit of prints on display through November 20th. Japan's self-imposed isolation came to an end in 1909, when the first delegation of Japanese businessmen arrived in the U.S. The embassy celebrates the centennial of this historic exchange with an exhibit of colorful woodblock reprints revealing the foundations of Japan's modern infrastructure and urbanization.

(September 17) THE ART OF AIRMEN The United States Air Force Band Airmen of Note performs at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Take 5 Jazz Concert tomorrow night starting at 5 pm. With a fifty-year tradition of modern big band jazz, the Airmen soar both in the air and on stage.

NPR

Meet The Guy Calling Out Hollywood For How It Describes Women

Three months ago, producer Ross Putnam started tracking descriptions of female characters from scripts he read. On Tuesday, he shared them with the world on his Twitter account, "Fem Script Intros."
NPR

Buy Crop Insurance, Double Your Money

The nation's crop insurance program is really a lottery, says one prominent economist. And it's rigged so that farmers win. In fact, farmers typically get back double the money they pay for premiums.
NPR

Buy Crop Insurance, Double Your Money

The nation's crop insurance program is really a lottery, says one prominent economist. And it's rigged so that farmers win. In fact, farmers typically get back double the money they pay for premiums.
NPR

Do You Like Me? Swiping Leads To Spike In Online Dating For Young Adults

A study by the Pew Research Center finds the use of online dating sites has mushroomed in the past few years, particularly among 18- to 24-year-olds.

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