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Supreme Court Could Rule On Whether Redskin's Name Is Offensive

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A group of American Indians who say the name of the Washington Redskins football team is derogatory and offensive has asked the Supreme Court to give its opinion.

The case, by seven Native Americans, has been working its way through the courts since 1992. The goal is to have the team's trademarks declared invalid.

In 1999, a panel of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ruled for the group, saying the team's name is disparaging to Native Americans. But since then, several judges have ruled for the team, saying the group waited too long to bring its suit.

Now the case could be headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, after lawyers for the group filed a petition on Monday. According to the Legal Times, the group's lawyer is citing Supreme Court rulings in recent years saying trademarks can be canceled at any time.

Matt McCleskey reports...

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