: News

Filed Under:

Hearing To Investigate Fire Preparations In D.C.

Play associated audio

The D.C. Council returns from its summer recess today. The first order of business for one committee: a public hearing about the city's fire hydrants.

A fire at the home of philanthropist Peggy Cooper Cafritz on July 29th sounded alarms about the District's ability to control fires. Low water pressure made it difficult for firefighters to put out the flames in Northwest D.C.'s Foxhall neighborhood.

Councilman Jim Graham is calling the hearing to make sure that doesn't happen again. "When there's serious questions about whether there's an adequate water supply to fight a fire such as what occurred at the home of Peggy Cooper Cafritz--this is something that we've got to pay very close attention to," says Graham.

Graham says the city has identified 38 locations that require capital improvements or special plans for fighting fires. Those sites will be discussed at the hearing.

"But the question, of course, is how many other areas are there in the city that require either capital improvements or special plans," Graham says. Graham expects to learn more about the answer to that question today.

Rebecca Blatt reports...

NPR

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Yes, the green aprons remain, but you may begin noticing more personal flair underneath. Instead of black and white garments, baristas are now free to embrace "drabby chic."
NPR

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Yes, the green aprons remain, but you may begin noticing more personal flair underneath. Instead of black and white garments, baristas are now free to embrace "drabby chic."
NPR

Clinton Poised To Become First Female Presidential Nominee Of A Major Party

The proceedings will begin with a roll call vote and the delegates will officially nominate Clinton as the their party's nominee for president.
NPR

FBI Investigates Possible Russian Connection To Leaked DNC Emails

Hackers tied to two Russian intelligence agencies breached DNC computers in May, but whether the same hackers turned over thousands of emails to WikiLeaks is still under investigation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.