Antietam Soldier's Remains To Be Transferred To New York | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Antietam Soldier's Remains To Be Transferred To New York

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The remains of a Civil War soldier discovered last year at the Antietam National Batlefield in Maryland will be returned to New York this week for burial. The soldier was killed on September 17, 1862 in the Miller's cornfield area of the Antietam battlefield and buried there within days of the battle. But during a reburial process after the war in 1866, he was missed. A visitor to Antietam happened upon his remains while walking in the cornfield area last year.

The soldier could not be identified, but an analysis of the remains and items recovered with them showed he was between 17 and 19 years of age and served in a unit from New York. A ceremony to transfer his remains to the New York Army National Guard will be conducted Tuesday. A burial with full military honors will follow on Thursday, the 147th anniversary of the battle of Antietam, at Saratoga National Cemetery in New York.

Matt McCleskey has more...

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