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Adams Morgan Day Festival Returns to DC

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Huge crowds are expected at the Adams Morgan Day Festival in Washington but it won't necessarily mean extra business for local shops. Kobos African Clotheirs has been in Adams Morgan for more than two decades. Owner Mahama Bawa says many indie retail stores here don't see an up-tick in sales the day of the festival because the high end street vendors have been replaced over the years with stands that sell budget items. And those just don't attract buyers for their kind of merchandise.

"You're getting socks for sale and t-shirts three for ten. You start cheapening your own festival if you don't carefully watch it."

"Well, I don't care what they said. That's not true." That's Lisa Duperier, who heads the Adams Morgan Main Street Group which organizes the festival.

"A great number of businesses do see business the day of the festival and it's one of their biggest money makers." The festival includes food, music and art. It's one of the oldest neighborhood festivals in the country.

Mana Rabiee reports...

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