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Muslims in Montgomery County Reflect on 9-11 Anniversary as Ramadan Ends

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This year the anniversary of September 11th coincides almost perfectly with the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, a fact not lost on the large crowd that gathered for a Ramadan celebration in Rockville.

More than 200 people gathered at the Monroe street county office building for this Ramadan celebration.

To Khalil Abu Amsaa, a 34-year-old area native and Muslim convert, who helped lead the crowd in prayer, the turnout was a bit of a shock.

"I was not expecting this, to be honest. It's nice to see this diversity," Amsaa said.

Mimi Hassanien a native of Egypt who has been in America for forty years, said the gathering reflected just how far the area, and the country has come since the dark days following 9-11.

But she also urged her fellow Muslims to continue building bridges as well.

"When you go to your place of worship, don't isolate yourself there," she said. "Network with your community, network with your friends. Don't just isolate yourself."

County executive Ike Leggett was also in attendance and briefly addressed the crowd the event was organized by Montgomery Countys Muslim Council.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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