: News

Filed Under:

Mass Vaccination Serves As Practice For H1N1 Vaccine

Play associated audio

At T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, nearly 600 people rolled up their sleeves for some of the years first flu shots.

Alexandria Health Department director Lisa Kaplowitz says the exercise is more than just a mass vaccination. It was also practice for when the H1N1 or swine flu vaccine is ready.

"Every event is a learning experience for us," Kaplowitz said. "We're really looking at what works and what doesn't work."

All the volunteers here were part of the Medical Reserve Corps a group founded in the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 attacks, and now sponsored by the Surgeon Generals office.

Congressman Jim Moran, and U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, were also on hand to get their shots, along with Assistant Secretary for Health Dr. Howard Koh.

"With each vaccine given, that's one small shot for man, and one giant leap for public health," Koh quipped.

Bad jokes aside--Secretary Sebelius delivered some seriously good news about the H1N1 vaccine, which is expected to be ready in October.

This week, clinical trials showed adults will only have to take one dose for effective immunization.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

NPR

On Television, More Transgender Characters Come Into Focus

Now that it's more common to see gay characters on TV, is the medium turning to transgender people for fresh stories? NPR's Neda Ulaby looks at TV's crop of transgender and "gender fluid" characters.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
NPR

Pennsylvania Congresswoman Goes All In For Obamacare

Does Rep. Allyson Schwartz's pro-Affordable Care Act television ad signal a new thinking among Democrats running in statewide races?
NPR

FCC To Propose Change To Net Neutrality Rules, Media Report

The FCC is expected to put out new Internet traffic rules that would let content providers negotiate for better service. NPR's Melissa Block talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Gautham Nagesh.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.