Virginia Transportation Secretary Says State Can't Meet Basic Goals | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Virginia Transportation Secretary Says State Can't Meet Basic Goals

Play associated audio

Virginia has cut transportation funding by more than $4 billion in the last year and a half. It's all but eliminated the funding it gives local jurisdictions for secondary roads. And it's laid off nearly 1,500 transportation employees.

At a meeting of Northern Virginia business leaders, Transportation Secretary Pierce Homer says his agency is in a full-blown crisis. "And the reason for that," says Homer, "Is that we are a business that is based on the sale of gasoline and new and used cars. It is not a healthy business model."

In Virginia, transportation is funded through taxes on gas and car sales. Both have plummeted in this recession. Secretary Homer says he'd like to start new projects, such as extending Metro's Orange line to Centreville. "But how do you do that," he asks, "In this environment where we're not taking care of what we already have?"

Homer warns Virginia may lose out on federal funding for new projects because it can't provide matching funds.

David Schultz reports...

NPR

How To Sell Diverse Books: A Bookstore Owner's Advice

It's not news that the publishing world isn't very diverse. But over on the other side of the industry, how do owners of neighborhood bookstores try to sell books for or about people of color?
NPR

Can Quinoa Take Root On The 'Roof Of The World'?

Quinoa, once a homebody crop, crossed the Atlantic for the first time this century. Now the Food and Agriculture Organization has a hunch it can thrive in Central and Southwest Asia.
NPR

Senate Control May Swing On North Carolina's Unpopularity Contest

Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan wants voters to punish her GOP challenger Thom Tillis, the speaker of the state House, for unpopular laws. Tillis wants to aim anger toward the president at Hagan.
NPR

Islamic State Uses Online Strategies To Get Its Message Out

Experts say the videotaped killing of journalist James Foley is part of a broader propaganda strategy by Islamist militants. The group, the Islamic State, has become a master of the video medium.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.